The Taboo of Mental Health

The Taboo of Mental Health

Mental illness is a topic not discussed openly in many social settings. Many people with such issues as mental illness hide their fears and depression for fear of being stigmatized, especially in the workplace and in churches. For me, this has been true until I came to grips with limitations learning to use them to my advantage. Feeling hopeless, I desperately clung to anything I could control, striving for my own perfectionism. I discovered true perfectionism comes in Christ and knowing Him.  My body looked as sick and malnourished as my soul felt, but acknowledging Christ had control opened my eyes to understanding my mental illness. God has healed, for the most part, left me some aspects of mental illness as a thorn in the flesh, so I could understand and help those who suffer like me!

In most places around the world, mental illness is considered a taboo! People who are affected by mental illness are made to think they are victims of witchcraft or possessed by evil spirits. Believe me; I have seen the difference of someone who is mentally ill and someone who is demon-possessed. There is a big difference. Society blames those who suffer with mental illness for their condition, thinking it their fault. Certain types of mental disorders have patterns of aggressive behavior with displays of hatred, contempt and fear. Still, in someplace around the world, the common approach to dealing with responses to aggressive, uncontrolled behavior or even severe depression is still electroshocked, beatings, or locking up in Mental institutions.

Have you ever felt uncomfortable talking about mental health issues with your friends or family? This article shows how different people respond to mental health stigmas at home, work, communities, and church. There is a need for people to candidly share their struggles with one another, learning from each other. Things like anxiety, depression, suicidal thoughts and the taboos around the topics should not be made more difficult than the solution. People do not want to be seen as “weak” or crazy,” but they may deal with family members who refuse to accept that they have a mental illness. I have learned this is a poignant and call for more acceptance about the mental health struggles that many of us face at some point in life.

“I know it is not easy because of those moments of depression when all hope seems lost. At those times, we need to seek a Psychiatrist, Pastor, Counselor, or friend for help in coping. From time to time, we all need a psychiatrist; it is OK! Even the ones who we consider stronger than ourselves need help, though they will not admit it. The love we experience in life is too strong to give up. Just tap into the love of God, the means for survival. Even the ones who we consider stronger than ourselves need help, though they will not admit it. The love we experience in life is too strong to give up. Just tap into the love of God, the means for survival.” Darren LaBrecque. Pilgrimage toward Recovery (p. 51).

Article Written & Issued by: Minister Darren LaBrecque / Co-Site Director of Mental Health Support Group

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